Greenleaf
Guide to Ancient Egypt
Cynthia Shearer
Grades: 2 to 7
Organizes readings & activities into 10 lessons with each lesson taking one to two weeks. Includes vocabulary lists and discussion questions. Can be adapted for grades 2-7. Recommended by Mary Pride. Paperback.

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Score: 5/5
C. Gallacher, Simi Valley, CA   (1/1/2012)
Pros: When I learned history, I could never figure our how everything fit together because we were jumping all over in time. Greenleaf has started with ancient history using biographies and going through history. This is a wonderful curriculum as they have you interact with the student in thoughtful discussions. We are just finishing the vikings to move on to middle ages. In addition, we use the Book of Centuries to record our own time line.
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Score: 5/5
T. Mazzo, Oak Point, TX   (1/1/2012)
Pros: I have enjoyed using the Greenleaf Guides. My fifth-grader and I used this guide while using Greenleaf's Old Testament guide. We gained so many insights by using them together. For instance, Egyptians are known to have believed in many gods. But did you know that one of the last pharoah's (believed to have been married to the daughter of the pharoah of the Exodus) tried to institute the worship of one god? He was quietly removed from his position and not many years later came the fall of Egypt! The guide also shows the relationship between Egyptian ''gods'' and the 10 plagues. It was interesting to find out that God didn't just arbitrarily choose the plagues. Each one had a message, and apparently only one Egyptian truly got the message. If your studying Egypt, you've got to have this book!
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Score: 5/5
Susan Moore, SC   (1/1/2012)
Pros: The folks at Greenleaf Press have a different way of looking at history. Traditionally history is taught ineffectively. If you will allow a comparison to the astronomer Ptolemy, I will attempt an illustration. Just as Ptolemy thought the universe revolved around the Earth, history is most often presented as if it all hinged on the founding and establishment of the United States. One quick glance at a timeline, however, will serve as a reminder that the United States is a fairly recent happening in world history, a current event, if you will. In addition, history is frequently presented in a dry format, which does not foster the interest of the student. There is not much incentive to ''get excited'' about memorizing a series of dates about people who do not appear to have any influence on our current lives. Instead, Rob and Cyndy Shearer, the authors of Greenleaf Guides, do an excellent job of presenting history as an intricately woven web of interrelated generations, and they do so by teaching history chronologically - literally, from the beginning! Gone are the boring dates, useless facts to memorize and mind-numbing drills about things students never care about. Instead the Shearer's have taken the best of historical non-fiction books, reprinted the books, and developed study guides to accompany them. Students will read wonderful biographies of the most important historical figures, and through discussion determine what impact each figure had on history. The guides begin with the study of the Old Testament, including 196 biographical readings and character studies. Ancient Egypt follows the study of the Old Testament, then Ancient Greece & Rome, the Middle Ages, and finally the Renaissance & Reformation guides to history round out the curriculum. The lessons are simple to present, and the information is easily retained by the students., best of all a reason to study history is discovered, and a love of quality literature is fostered. Usually marketed to the homeschooling arena, I would recommend this series to all parents; especially if you really want your children to enjoy learning about history.
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